Main image
18th July
2012
written by indusorg

black seed flowers black seed micro greenblack seed

The seeds of Nigella sativa Linn. (Ranunculaceae), commonly known as black seed or black cumin, are used in folk (herbal) medicine all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases and conditions that include asthma, diarrhoea and dyslipidaemia. Much of the biological activity of the seeds has been shown to be due to thymoquinone, the major component of the essential oil. The pharmacological actions of the crude extracts of the seeds (and some of its active constituents, e.g. volatile oil and thymoquinone) that have been reported include protection against nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by either disease or chemicals. The seeds/oil have antiinflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial and anti-neoplastic activity. The seed/oil decreases blood pressure and increases respiration[1].

Nigella sativa has been used as traditional medicine for centuries. The crude oil and thymoquinone (TQ) extracted from its seeds and oil are effective against many diseases like cancer, cardiovascular complications, diabetes, asthma, kidney disease etc. It is effective against cancer in blood system, lung, kidney, liver, prostate, breast, cervix, skin with much safety. The molecular mechanisms behind its anticancer role is still not clearly understood, however, some studies showed that TQ has antioxidant role and improves body’s defense system.[2]. Nigella sativa seeds, oil or its active ingredients are effective against different cancers (blood cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, Pancreatic cancer, Hepatic Cancer, Lung Cancer, Skin Cancer, Fibrosarcoma, Renal Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Cervical Cancer) [2]. Cancers are the abnormal cell growth caused by genetic alteration. So, any agent which has anti-cancer activity, either protect genetic material from alteration or kill the genetically altered cancer cells. The active ingredients (mainly TQ) from N. sativa act on cancer cell to help to kill them by several molecular pathways.

There are two questions that people ask me : 1) How do I eat them ?. 2) Is oil better than seeds ?

Black seeds can be taken in many ways without destroying their beneficial oils. Here are few

1) Put them in soil and grow  them. You can get micro greens that can be eaten in salad or soups.

2) Put the seeds in the hot water, keep them for 10 minutes for simmering, filter and drink the water. You can do what  Egyptians do every day.

3) Roast the seed and chew them.

4) Sprinkle them in salad along with salad dressing

5) Use them as a spice  blend in curry

6) Sprinkle the seeds in dough of your bread.

We will post some recipes here shortly so that you can use black seeds as part of your regular diet.

In my personal opinion, seeds can be eaten in many ways without destroying their benefits. However, oil has limited usage. I don’t know how much benefits you will use by doing a cold press ?.

 

 

Technical References:

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12722128?dopt=Abstract

2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252704/

We have provided information on this page for informational purpose ONLY. Information has been gathered from books and natural health practitioners. Please consult a natural health practitioner for your condition. Black Seed has not been approved as medicine by USFDA.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

12th February
2012
written by indusorg

Black pepper has been known as king of spices. It can be found in every dining room, irrespective of country, religion and financial status. However, there are marked differences in the pepper grown in Brazil, Indonesia, India, Malaysia and Vietnam. People around the world love little spiciness in their food. Black pepper is used in various cuisines, cheese, chips, drinks etc. Black Pepper can not be grown in Europe, Russia, China and North America due to weather and soil conditions. Most of the black pepper in the western world is imported from above mentioned countries. It is so common a product that futures are sold in the stock market. Pepper Farmers call it, “Black Gold”, since it can be stored for long period of time and can be sold worldwide.The popular saying of,  “money does not grow on trees”, does not apply to pepper, cinnamon and nutmeg. These are some of the most expensive spices in the world for centuries.  These products have colonized countries and wars have been fought. Columbus was looking for pepper and other spices when he arrived in America. British colonized India for pepper trade for a century. Following map shows the map location of Tellicherry region in Kerala, India.

Map of Tellicherry Region

Black pepper grows on vines in rain forests of cardamom, ginger, turmeric, clove and coffee. Let us look at the pepper from India that has been used worldwide for its taste, aroma and pungency. There are mainly two known grades, Malabar and Tellicherry. These names signify their origin just like French Wines. There are marked differences between two peppers. These peppers are classified based on bulk density, size and percentage of light berries as shown in the table
Black Pepper Comparison
Steam Sterilized Pepper Type Berry Size Bulk Density % Light Berries By Weight
Organic Malabar Black Peppercorn 3.75 mm 550 gm/liter 2.0%
Organic Tellicherry Black Peppercorns 4.75 mm 590 gm/liter 1.25%
Organic Jumbo Black Peppercorns 5.5 mm 570 gm/liter 0.85%
A black pepper is marked Tellicherry Special ExtraBold (TGSEB) when berries can be retained on sieve having holes of diameter 4.75 mm and it has bulk density of about 500 gm/lt. Malabar black pepper is retained on sieve of 3.75 mm and it has bulk density of 550 gm/lt. We can see the picture of these peppercorns in the following:
Black Peppercorn Comparison

Indus Organics Jumbo Black Peppercorn

Jumbo Peppercorns are the largest ripe berries. These fully mature berries have very unique taste compared to ordinary pepper. We steam sterilize the Jumbo berries for high purity. This removes some of the softer outer skin of the ripe berries. These berries before steam sterilization are more than 5.5 mm in diameter which makes them the largest black pepper in the world. Click here to buy them online

Indus Organics Jumbo Pepper

 

Indus Organic Tellicherry Pepper  

Indus Organics Tellicherry Special Extra Bold (TGSEB) Peppercorn are very high quality peppercorns grown in southern India. These mature and ripe berries have unique taste and aroma. These peppers are steam sterilized to obtain high purity and low microbial. Steam sterilization of pepper reduces the size of fully ripe berries. Lot of companies sell lower grade pepper with large size. These peppers are not steam sterilized. Devil is in the details. Click here to buy them online

Indus Organics Tellicherry Pepper

Indus Organics Tellicherry Pepper

 

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

11th July
2011
written by indusorg

Herbs have been used for cooking and treating disease since ancient times. There are references to the curative properties of some herbs in the Rigveda, which is believed to have been written between 3500 and 1800 BC. A more detailed account is found in Atharveda. A comprehensive information about herbs has been recorded in Charka Samhita and Shusruta Samhita  – the two important works on Ayurvedic system of medicine.  Ayurvedic system deals with as many as 700 herbs, some of which have not even originated in India. Chinese medicine has a compilation of 1000 ancient herbs. Hippocrates (460 BC) the Greek physician and father of modern medicine has also listed several hundred herbal remedies.

Herbs play a significant role, especially in modern times, when the damaging effects of food processing and over medication have assumed alarming proportions. They are now being used heavily in cosmetics, food, tea and alternative medicine. The growing interest in herbs is a part of movement towards change in life style. This movement is based on the belief that plants have vast potential for their use as curative medicine.

Herbs are used in many ways in our lives. The active constituents must be absorbed into the body for deriving the required benefits. Once they are absorbed in the blood stream, they circulate to influence our whole system. Herbs are used in many modern medications and Homeopathic medicine in various concentrations. The skill of the herbalist is to use the effects to balance and strengthen the body’s own healing mechanism instead of suppressing or disturbing it.  Many modern medications made with herbs are not prepared for healing mechanism.

A word of caution. While most herbs have little or no harmful side effects, some herbs may cause undesirable reaction in some people. Therefore, advise of trained herbalist is very useful in the selection of herb to use the curative properties. Also, not all herbal applications are effective in every case in every person since every individual has different constitution (Dosha in Ayurvedic medicine).

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

8th January
2011
written by indusorg

An aphrodisiac is a substance that increases sexual desire. The name comes from Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of sexuality and love. Throughout history, many foods, drinks, and behaviors have had a reputation for making sex more attainable and/or pleasurable. In many cultures around the world, herbs are used to enhance the love making. Usage of these herbs can provide the desired results without side effects. We list here these herbs and their usage. These herbs can be incorporated in daily food thus avoiding any herbal supplements.  Usage of these herbs together in appropriate combination can enhance the effects. Some time it is important to take these herbs in a prescribed manner for optimal results. Keeps these herbs in your pantry and enjoy the love of your dear one !.

Garlic:  It has pronouced aphrodisiac effects and provides a natural tonic for loss of sexual power from any cause. It has been used to treat impotency caused overindulgence in sex and nervous exhasution from dissipating habit. It is especially useful for people suffering from nervious tension and lower libido. Use it in pizza, pasta, curry, soups, sauces, bread or pickles. Spanish and Italians use it in almost every food !.

Ginger: Ginger juice is aphrodisiac in nature. It tones the appropriate organs and cures impotency, premature ejaculation and spermatorrhoea or involuntary seminal discharge. Ginger can be added in tea, curry and soups to provide flavor. Ginger juice or powder ( 1 tea spoon ) can be taken with honey at night for good results.

Cardamom: Cardamom has been used in sexual dysfunction like impotency and premature ejaculation. Few pods of cardamom boiled in milk and sweetened with honey every night would yield excellent results. It is used in Garam Masala and Masala Chai blends for unique taste and arome. However, excessive usage of cardamom at times may lead to impotency.

Bishop Weed (Ajwain): Ajwain seeds combined with kernal of tamarind seeds are an effective aphrodisiac. These should be fried in clarified butter, powdered and preserved in airtight container. A teaspoon of this powder with honey taken before going to bed makes an excellent aphrodisiac. It increases virility and cures premature ejaculation. Bishop weeds are used as spice in flavoring numerous foods, as antioxidants, preservatives and medicine.

Asafoetida: It is a resinous gum of a tall perennial herb with carrot shaped roots. It is a dirty yellow in color with pungent smell. It is very difficult to eat in raw form. however, it is a constituent of many spice blends and teas. Asafoetida is beneficial in the treatment of impotency, spermatorrhoea and premature ejaculation.

Winter Cherry:  Winter Cherry or Ashwagandha has been used by natural health practitioners to cure many medical conditions. Herb has been used more recently for its aphrodisiac properties. 2-4 gms of root powder with milk or clarified butter can be taken as aphrodisiac to enhance libido.

These herbs are suggested by natural health practitioners around the world.

Links are from medical journals and do not represent the suggestions or advise of Indus Organics. Please consult your natural health practitioner for usage. It is not advisable to discontinue your current medication and start natural herbs without consulting your doctor.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

25th December
2010
written by indusorg

Depression is a major problem faced by people of all ages around the world in this modern society. It is very hard to get away from depression. People face it no matter who you are and what you do. Depression is caused by unhapiness, lonely ness and various other reasons. Depression is a common disorder found in elderly people mainly due to lonelyness. As we are moving forward towards moderanization, we are busy and don’t have much time for our loved and dear ones.

Depression is a day today problem and it is not a disease in my opinion. It is a state of condition that changes with time and location. Eating Mediterranean diet generally makes people less depressed. There are number of studies done on the subject. In my opinion, ingredients used in Mediterranean food are responsible. According to Ayurvedic studies, Allium Sativum (garlic), has intellect promoting properties that may alleviate depression.

In a pilot study, dehydrated powder of  Indian garlic was administered to 32 patients with depresion. The garlic powder was given at a dose of 1 gm (equivalent to 5 gm of raw garlic) three times a day for 1 month. Results showed significant relief in seven of eight symptoms tested as shown below. This study was done at Institute of Post Graduate Teaching and Research in Ayurveda at Jamnagar, Gujarat, India.

EFFECT OF ALLIUM SATIVUM LINN. ON DEPRESSION

                                                           Mean score  a*

Symptom                               Before                    After        Percent relief                         

Depressed mood                2.23                        0.92                        55.19                                     

Guilt                                        1.38                        0.53                        61.33                                                     

Suicidal tendency               0.53                       0.30                      43.54                                     

Insomnia                               1.23                        0.61                        50.03                                     

Work and interest               3.00                       1.23                       51.28                                     

Agitation                                1.07                       0.30                       71.89                                     

Gastrointestinal                    1.46                       0.07                       94.83                                     

Genital symptoms               0.38                       0.07                        80.97                                     

a* The mean score highlights the grading of symptoms based on mild, moderate, and severity of symptom.

Links are from medical journals and do not represent the suggestions or advise of Indus Organics. Please consult your natural health practitioner for usage. It is not advisable to discontinue your current medication and start natural herbs without consulting your doctor.

Author wish to thank Prof. Hari Sharma, MD, DABP, FCAP, FRCPC, DABHM

The Ohio State University Center for Integrative Medicine; College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. for providing the article THE JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE Volume 13, Number 9, 2007, pp. 1011–1019 © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/acm.2007.7017-A that forms the basis of this blog.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

19th December
2010
written by indusorg

Introduction: This blog series will compile research and articles published in reputed medical journals by experts in medical field. Idea of this series is to educate and introduce people about alternative medicine and how it can supplement the current modern medicine. There are some good things that can be learnt from alterantive medicine due to its long history of  usage worldwide. All medical practices such as Nature Cure, Ayurvedic, Homeopathy, Chinese and Modern medicine have limitations. A synergetic and complimentary usage of different practices could provide results that are not achievable with single practice. An integrative approach is needed to combat the illnesses at cost effective manner.

Although remarkable technological advances have taken place in the fields of prevention, control, and cure of disease, the health status of people globally is far from satisfactory. An estimated 17 million people worldwide die of cardiovascular diseases each year.[1] More than 22 million people worldwide had cancer in the year 2000.[2] In that same year, 171 million people globally had diabetes.[3] Western allopathic medicine has not achieved the objective of health for all, even for those who can afford its high costs. In some instances, this system of medicine has even contributed to the ill health of those patients who utilize it, through toxic side-effects and other iatrogenic disorders.[4–7] The forte of allopathic medicine is its ability to deal with acute medical crises such as trauma, myocardial infarction, infections, and so on. However, from the Ayurvedic point of view, its understanding of chronic diseases and their underlying pathology is superficial and incomplete, which renders it unable to effectively treat these disorders.[8,9] Moreover, allopathic medicine has not yet reached the vast majority of people in rural and remote areas, especially in developing countries.

In India, the traditional system of medicine known as Ayurveda is generally the only system of medicine available in villages and remote areas. This comprehensive, natural health care system has been utilized for more than 5000 years for prevention, health promotion, and treatment of disease. [11] After undergoing a period of suppression during colonial rule, Ayurveda has experienced a resurgence in the last several decades and interest in it is now growing worldwide.[12,13] In India, a technological revolution is occurring in which the scientific techniques of modern medicine are being utilized to investigate and validate Ayurveda in a new light. This blending of the old and new is exemplified in what Mashelkar refers to as “a golden triangle between traditional medicine, modern medicine, and modern science.”[14]

Homeopathy was invented in Germany and it is widely used worldwide. It is used in every nook and corner of India by rich and poor. It is affordable and takes care of daily needs as well as some chronic illnesses. However, it is unfortunate that it is not practiced widely in North America.

A new look at the policy level is needed to examine the integrative medicine. Cost of health care is rising worldwide and causing variety of problems ranging from budget deficit to human lives. Modern medicine companies are so powerful due to their financial muscle and current investment that  it is not expected that they will do anything in near future.

References :

1. World Health Organization. CVD Prevention and Control: Missed opportunities. Online document at:

 

www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/prevention_control/en/ Accessed August diseases/prevention_control 28, 2007.

2. Stewart BW, Kleihues P, eds. World Cancer Report. Lyon, France: IARC Press, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2003.

3. World Health Organization. Diabetes Programme. Online document at www.who.int/diabetes/facts/world_figures/en/ Accessed August 28, 2007.

4. Lazarou J, Pomeranz BH, Corey PN. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized patients. JAMA 1998;279: 1200–1205.

5. Morrissey J. Patient safety proves elusive. Five years after publication of the IOM’s “To Err is Human,” there’s plenty of activity on patient safety, but progress is another matter. Modern Healthcare 2004;34:6–7, 24–25, 28–32.

6. Starfield B. Is US health really the best in the world? JAMA 2000;284:483–485.

7. Steel K, Gertman PM, Crescenzi C, Anderson J. Iatrogenic illness on a general medical service at a university hospital. N Engl J Med 1981;304:638–642.

8. Chowka P. Major US and UK studies heighten concerns about conventional medical care. Online document at: www.naturalhealthline.com/ Accessed March 17, 2001.

9. Hoffman C, Rice D, Sung H-Y. Persons with chronic conditions: Their prevalence and costs. JAMA 1996;276

10. Bodeker G, Ong C-K, Grundy C, et al., eds. WHO Global Atlas of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Text and Map Volumes. Kobe, Japan: World Health Organization, The WHO Centre for Health Development, 2005.

11. Lavekar GS, Sharma SK. Republic of India. WHO South- East Asia Region: Regional overview and selected country chapters. In: Bodeker G, Ong C-K, Grundy C, et al., eds. WHO Global Atlas of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Text and Map Volumes. Kobe, Japan: World Health Organization, The WHO Centre for Health Development, 2005:89–96.

12. Valiathan MS. Towards Ayurvedic Biology. A Decadal Vision Document. Bangalore, India: Indian Academy of Sciences, 2006.

13. Mishra LC, ed. Scientific Basis for Ayurvedic Therapies. New York: CRC Press, 2004.

14. Mashelkar RA. India’s R&D: Reaching for the top. Science 2005;307:1415–1417.

15. Patwardhan B. Traditional Medicine: Modern Approach for Affordable Global Health. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005.

Links are from medical journals and do not represent the suggestions or advise of Indus Organics. Please consult your natural health practitioner for usage. It is not advisable to discontinue your current medication and start natural herbs without consulting your doctor.

Author wish to thank Prof. Hari Sharma, MD, DABP, FCAP, FRCPC, DABHM

The Ohio State University Center for Integrative Medicine; College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. for providing the article THE JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE Volume 13, Number 9, 2007, pp. 1011–1019 © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/acm.2007.7017-A that forms the basis of this blog.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

4th December
2010
written by indusorg

Indus Organics Cumin Powder
Indus Organic Cumin Powder

Cumin powder and its seeds are very popular in many Asian, Mexican, Middle    Eastern and Spanish world. Cumin is used in many culinary preparations. Most of  the Indian curries are incomplete unless there is a pinch of cumin. Popular spice blends like Curry powder and Garam Masala uses cumin as one of the main ingredient.These seeds are new in North America. Most of the People don’t know  the medicinal value of cumin.

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum Linn.) is antidiabetic; it reduces blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma cholesterol, tissue cholesterol, phospholipids, free fatty acids, and triglycerides. Cumin was more effective in treating diabetes than the drug glibenclamide in an animal model. [1] Cumin is antibacterial, [2] hepatoprotective, [3] and improves irritable bowel syndrome.[4]
Asian spice blends like curry powder, Garam Masala and other similar mixtures were created by ancient Ayurvedic system to meet the needs of taste and health.  People don’t realize that making a curry with appropriate mix of spices  has long lasting health benefits. It has roots and research of hundred’s of years that uses synergistic effects of individual ingredients.
Ayurveda’s materia medica is extensive, with more than 700 herbs described in detail in the ancient texts [5]. Herbs and herbal mixtures utilized in Ayurveda are prepared by using the various parts of the plant (e.g., the root, leaves, fruits, bark, seeds, etc.). Herbs are sometimes used singly but more often in combination to provide synergistic effects and mitigate toxic side-effects [6]. Ayurveda does not recommend isolating the active ingredient because toxic side effects can occur and the synergistic benefits are lost. [7]. Extensive research has been conducted on Ayurvedic herbs over the past 100 years.

Medical Journal References

1. Dhandapani S, Subramanian VR, Rajagopal S, Namasivayam N. Hypolipidemic effect of on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Pharmacol Res 2002;46: 251–255.

2. Singh G, Kapoor IPS, Pandey SK, et al. Studies on essential oils: Part 10; Antibacterial activity of volatile oils of some spices. Phytother Res 2002;16:680–682.

3. Sambaiah K, Srinivasan K. Influence of spices and spice principles on hepatic mixed function oxygenase system in rats. Indian J Biochem Biophys 1989;26:254–258.

4. Kumar N, Kumar A. A comparison of different drug schedules under different groups of Siddha 1997;18:79.

5. K Patwardhan B, Vaidya ADB, Chorghade M. Ayurveda and natural products drug discovery. Curr Sci 2004;86:789–799

6. Mishra LC, ed. Scientific Basis for Ayurvedic Therapies.  New York: CRC Press, 2004.

7. Sharma HM. Phytochemical synergism: Beyond the active ingredient model. Altern Ther Clin Pract 1997;4:91–96.

Author has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your primary health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. The mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by Author.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

22nd November
2010
written by indusorg

Ginger Powder

I have been using Ginger in Masala Chai since childhood. I have been drinking Chai for its soothing taste and aroma. I used to drink specially when going on long drives in hilly mountains to avoid vomiting. My Granny used to make the Chai at our home. She knew the medicinal and curative properties of herbs, spices and roots. I did not know the magical properties of these ingredients until few years ago. I thought it will be interesting to talk about the magical properties of Ginger. Ginger is available worldwide in grocery stores in root form. It can be used in making Ginger bread, Ginger cookies, Chai, Ginger flavored drinks and other dishes.

Ginger Plant
Ginger root is used extensively as a spice in many if not most cuisines of the world. Though called a root, it is actually the rhizome of the monocotyledonous perennial plant Zingiber officinale. Ginger contains upt to 3% of an essential oil which causes the fragrance of the spice. The main constituents are sesquiterpenoids with zingiberene as the main component. Lesser amounts of other sesquiterpenoids (β-sesquiphellandrene, bisabolene and farnesene) and a small monoterpenoid fraction (β-phelladrene, cineol, and citral) have also been identified. Young ginger roots are juicy and fleshy with a very mild taste. They are often pickled in vinegar or sherry as a snack or just cooked as an ingredient in many dishes. Mature ginger roots are fibrous and nearly dry. The juice from old ginger roots is extremely potent and is often used as a spice in Chinese cuisine to cover up other strong odors and flavors such as in seafood and mutton.

In Japan, ginger is pickled to make beni shoga and gari or grated and used raw on tofu or noodles. In Western cuisine, ginger is traditionally restricted to sweet foods, such as ginger ale, gingerbread, ginger snaps (a type of cookie), ginger cake and ginger biscuits.

Medical research has shown that ginger root is an effective treatment for nausea caused by motion sickness or other illness. Although very effective against all forms of nausea, PDR health officials do not recommend taking ginger root for morning sickness commonly associated with pregnancy. Ginger root also contains many antioxidants. Powdered dried ginger root is made into pills for medicinal use. Chinese women traditionally eat ginger root during pregnancy to combat morning sickness. Ginger ale and ginger beer have been recommended as “stomach settlers” for generations in countries where the beverages are made. Ginger water was commonly used to avoid heat cramps in the United States in the past.
I have listed some of the references on medicinal research on Ginger in following paragraph:

Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) has various beneficial effects. It reduces lipids, atherosclerotic lesions and lipid peroxide, and increases glutathione peroxidase.[1] These findings indicate that it would be beneficial in preventing and treating heart disease. It has anticancer properties [2] and anti-inflammatory effects.[3] It is antifungal,[4] antiemetic, and anxiolytic.[5] Ginger protects cells from beta-amyloid injury, which indicates it may protect against Alzheimer’s disease.[6],[7]

Scientifc References
1. Liu N, Huo G, Zhang L, Zhang X. Effect of Zingiber officinale Rosc on lipid peroxidation in hyperlipidemia rats. [in Chinese]. Wei Sheng Yan Jiu 2003;32:22–23.

2. Surh Y. Molecular mechanisms of chemopreventive effects of selected dietary and medicinal phenolic substances. Mutat Res 1999;428:305–327.

3. Penna SC, Medeiros MV, Aimbire FSC, et al. Anti-inflammatory effect of the hydralcoholic extract of Zingiber officinale rhizomes on rat paw and skin edema. Phytomedicine 2003;10:381–385.

4. Ficker CE, Arnason JT, Vindas PS, et al. Inhibition of human pathogenic fungi by ethnobotanically selected plant extracts. Mycoses 2003;46:29–37.

5. Vishwakarma SL, Pal SC, Kasture VS, Kasture SB. Anxiolytic and antiemetic activity of Zingiber officinale. Phytother Res 2002;16:621–626.

6. Kim DSHL, Kim J-Y, Han YS. Alzheimer’s disease drug discovery from herbs: Neuroprotectivity from beta -amyloid(1-42) insult. J Altern Complement Med 2007;13:333–340.

7. Kim DSHL, Kim D-S, Oppel MN. Shogaols from Zingiber officinale protect IMR32 human neuroblastoma and normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells from beta-amyloid(25-35) insult. Planta Med 2002;68:375–376.

Links are from medical journals and do not represent the suggestions or advise of Indus Organics. Please consult your natural health practitioner for usage. It is not advisable to discontinue your current medication and start natural herbs without consulting your doctor.

Author wish to thank Prof. Hari Sharma, MD, DABP, FCAP, FRCPC, DABHM
The Ohio State University Center for Integrative Medicine; College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. for providing the article THE JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE Volume 13, Number 9, 2007, pp. 1011–1019 © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/acm.2007.7017-A that forms the basis of this blog.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

12th November
2010
written by indusorg

Garlic is used around the world in various forms for centuries. It is used almost in every cooking. It]s usage ranges from garlic bread, pizza/pasta sauce, Indian curry, salad, Middle eastern food, to Mediterranean dishes. We eat it without knowing the medicinal properties of Garlic. It has been used as medicine for ages by natural health practitioners around the world. We list some of the findings by researchers of modern medicine. Eating Garlic in moderation can help reduce many problems we face in modern world. Garlic has unique properties due to its oil content. Garlic has been used by people to enhance the libido for ages. People don’t like to eat raw garlic due to smell and odor it releases. However, using it in your cooking will keep doctors away.
Garlic image
Garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) has been heavily researched and found to be beneficial in many different areas. It provides protection against heart disease in several ways. In clinical trials, garlic halted progression of arteriosclerotic plaque volume and in some cases even regressed it.[1] It reduced total serum cholesterol and triglycerides, increased HDL, and had antiplatelet activity.[2] Garlic is antihypertensive,[3] anticancer,[4] immuno-modulatory,[5] anti-inflammatory,[6] and antimicrobial.[7] It mitigates thyroxine-induced hyperglycemia [8] and may be helpful in preventing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.[9] . It has anti depression properties. Click here to buy amazing Indus garlic

Scientifc References
1.Koscielny J, Klüßendorf D, Latza R, et al. The antiatherosclerotic effect of Allium sativum. Atherosclerosis 1999;144:237–249.
2. Bordia A, Verma SK, Srivastava KC. Effect of garlic (Allium sativum) on blood lipids, blood sugar, fibrinogen and fibrinolytic activity in patients with coronary artery disease. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 1998;58:257–263.
3. Al-Qattan KK, Alnaqeeb MA, Ali M. The antihypertensive effect of garlic (Allium sativum) in the rat two-kidney—one-clip Goldblatt model. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;66:217–222.
4. Thomson M, Ali M. Garlic [Allium sativum]: A review of its potential use as an anti-cancer agent. Curr Cancer Drug Targets 2003;3:67–81.
5. Colic M, Vucevic D, Kilibarda V, et al. Modulatory effects of garlic extracts on proliferation of T-lymphocytes in vitro stimulated with concanavalin A. Phytomedicine 2002;9:117–124.
6. Hodge G, Hodge S, Han P. Allium sativum (garlic) suppresses leukocyte inflammatory cytokine production in vitro: Potential therapeutic use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Cytometry 2002;48:209–215.
7. Dikasso D, Lemma H, Urga K, et al. Investigation on the antibacterial properties of garlic (Allium sativum) on pneumonia causing bacteria. Ethiop Med J 2002;40:241–249.
8. Tahiliani P, Kar A. Mitigation of thyroxine-induced hyperglycaemia by two plant extracts. Phytother Res 2003;17:294–296.
9. Chauhan NB, Sandoval J. Amelioration of early cognitive deficits by aged garlic extract in Alzheimer’s transgenic mice. Phytother Res 2007;21:629–640.

Author wish to thank Prof. Hari Sharma, MD, DABP, FCAP, FRCPC, DABHM
The Ohio State University Center for Integrative Medicine; College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. for providing the article THE JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE Volume 13, Number 9, 2007, pp. 1011–1019 © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/acm.2007.7017-A that forms the basis of this blog.
Author has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your primary health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. The mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by Author.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

21st September
2010
written by indusorg

 Yogurt curry is very popular in Indian subcontinent.  In India, yogurt curry preparation changes from region to region. I will give the recipe for making different types of yogurt curry and then you can try them all.

Serves 4, Preparation Time: 10 min., Cooking Time: 30 min.

Common Ingredients:

1) 1 1/2 Cup of  plain milk yogurt

2) 8 Tbsp Gram Flour

3) 1/2 Tsp Indus Organics Turmeric Powder

4) 4 Tbsp Corn Oil

5) 2 Tsp Indus Organics Cumin Seeds

6) 10 Indus Organics Malabar Black Peppercorn

7) 6 Indus Organics Clove Buds

8) 2 Tsp Indus Organics Black Mustard Seeds

9) 2 Tsp Indus Organics Fenugreek Seeds

10) Salt per Taste

North Indian Version Additions : 4 Indus Organics Cayenne Pepper Whole

Central Indian Version Additions: 2 Tsp Sugar

South Indian Version Additions: 4 Curry Leaves

Process:

1) Mix the yogurt with gram flour, turmeric, salt and sugar (If you are making central India version)

2) Heat the oil in a heavy pan and add Cumin, Fenugreek Seeds, Peppercorns and Clove

3) Stir the yogurt mixture ensuring that there are no lumps. Add the mixture to the pan

4) Cook for 5-7 min. till consistency resembles that of a thick batter

5) Add curry leaves (If making south Indian version)

Yogurt curry is ready to serve with rice or Indian wheat bread.

Add to Del.cio.us RSS Feed Add to Technorati Favorites Stumble It! Digg It!
    www.sajithmr.me

Previous